Anthony Lagouranis
Military Interrogator Abu Ghraib, 2004
Chicago, Illinois
"I did work closely with Titan all year long while I was in Iraq and I could say that a lot of the translators weren't trained at all. I don't know what kind of training they received but they were terrible at it…. if the interrogator isn't effective in the interrogation booth then you can't get intelligence out of the prisoners and potentially lives are lost and the war is lost."
- Anthony Lagouranis

Anthony Lagouranis is a bright and curious young man from Chicago. Highly educated in a diverse range of languages, he joined the army as an interrogator hoping to learn Arabic to get a better understanding of ancient theological texts (and to help repay student loans). His time in Iraq changed his view of the War and of the world.

He arrived at Abu Ghraib shortly before 60 Minutes broke the story of torture at the prison. Working closely with interrogators and translators employed by CACI and TITAN, he was witness to their lack of training: “I did work closely with Titan all year long while I was in Iraq and I could say that a lot of the translators weren't trained at all. I don't know what kind of training they received but they were terrible at it…. if the interrogator isn't effective in the interrogation booth then you can't get intelligence out of the prisoners and potentially lives are lost and the war is lost.” His time at Abu Ghraib had a profound effect on him. Since returning to the U.S. Lagouranis has been a loud and clear voice speaking out on the abusive and problematic nature of private contracting in a war zone.

Read Tony's New York Times op-ed "Tortured Logic" (2/28/2006)
Learn more: Frontline's interview with Tony (9/25/2005)